Cullen

Cullen

The Auxiliary Hospital at Cullen was operational from 1914 and was housed in a building which was originally intended to be the Parish Home for the Cullen District.  This building had orginally been gifted to the town by Dr James Campbell, former Convener of Banffshire, factor for Caroline, Countess of Seafield and Town Councillor. On retirement from his job as factor in 1912, he gave £1,000 to provide a home for the poor of the parish as a parting gift.

By August 1914 the building had been completed and, at the outbreak of the First World War the council, with Dr Campbell’s consent, offered it to The Red Cross as a hospital for wounded soldiers. The first consignment of seven soldiers arrived by train in April 1915 and during the next four years many more were treated at the hospital.

The hospital was in a central location in the town with fine sea views, being at the junction of North Deskford Street and North Castle Street. The building still stands and is known locally as Campbell House

The Cullen Hospital was able to cater for at least a dozen patients at a time and, from the image hereof the staff, appears to have had a plentiful supply of willing nurses. An article in The Banffshire Advertiser in July 1915 lists patients from Perth, Lancashire, Edinburgh, Inverurie, Glasgow, Beith, Arbroath and Montrose who were receiving the tender ministrations of Nurse Mair, Nurse Paterson, Nurse Gowan, and Miss Ross under the watchful eye of Lady Superintendent Davidson.

Cullen Auxiliary Hospital
Cullen Auxiliary Hospital
Staff and patients outside Cullen Auxiliary Hospital in 1914
Cullen Hospital under construction
Cullen Hospital under construction