Women

Women

Women in Fife were to the forefront in organising and fund raising for charitable purposes, in particular, for hospital provision at home and aboard. Lady Eva Wemyss organised the provision of a 35 bed hospital to be sent out to France. Dr Adeline H Campbell worked in Serbia as a hospital surgeon. Mrs A C Mackintosh, Pittenweem received the Freedom of the Burgh in June 1918 in recognition of the valuable work she had carried out during the war years as secretary of the local War Pensions Committee.

We know of a dozen Fife women that joined the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corp and about 100 served as nurses and Voluntary Aid Detachment Nurses (VADs) here and abroad. The newspapers mentioned others in passing, like the young woman in Cupar who used her flying expertise and her own plane to fly above the battlefield of France in 1918 locating the burial sites.

Women increasingly filled jobs previously the preserve of men. Not all women found the experience of war in Fife to be so positive. The moral threat posed by the presence of a large number of men with money and little to occupy themselves while off duty, rang around the Kingdom. And some organisations managed to resist the push to employ women. The Chief Constable of Fife spent two years trying to find women who could fulfil the duties of police constables and undertake some clerical duties, before concluding that no suitable candidates existed.