Education and Recreation

Education and Recreation

Children and young people were heavily involved in the war effort. Scouts were regularly commandeered for Government work. Children were given time off school to gather moss for wound dressing. They collected conkers to make chemicals for munitions to replace synthetic material that had previously been imported from Germany. As war went on the School Logs show increasing numbers of children withdrawn from school to help support their families where their father was at war, disabled or dead.

The war also changed the make up of the school staff. Any fit man was taken for war work especially those with specialist skills. Tayport spent months trying to find a new master to teach mathematics and science. No sooner had they got him in post but the Army wanted him, to join a Specialist Gas Battalion. More and more women came into the classrooms.

The attitude to recreation and the idea of people having fun changed radically during war-time. Many clubs, bands and other organisations were broken up for the duration as their members went off to war and professional sports were condemned. However, as the war went on things changed. Teas and parties were organised for the children of service men. There were grand concerts to raise money for good causes and the picture houses showed patriotic films of the recruitment effort and then news-reels and films from the Front. The end of the war was marked by a sudden up rush of demand for licences for public entertainment.