Fighting Front

Fighting Front

Adverts for Nestles Milk and Horlicks.
Little changes in diet greatly helped to keep the system in tone, besides affording genuine pleasure to the recipients.

Local people were given advice about sending gifts to the Dardanelles and it was suggested that personal friends and the organisations which interested themselves in the welfare of the soldiers would do well to bear in mind the importance from a health point of view of occasional changes and little luxuries of diet.

Dysentery was the great enemy of troops in the Peninsula, and liability to it was aggravated in the early stages of the campaign by the monotony of a short rations diet, consisting of tea, with water of questionable quality, hard biscuit, jam, and bully beef. A more sufficient and more varied diet was eventually provided, but the choice was very restricted, and little changes greatly helped to keep the system in tone, besides affording genuine pleasure to the recipients.

It was suggested that some of the money spent on cigarettes (of which there was usually an ample supply) might well be diverted to the purchase of tablets of malted milk, soup tabloids, powdered milk, arrowroot, or other little luxuries easily posted. Acid drops or other sweets which tended to quench the thirst were popular. Horlick’s Malted Milk Company, Slough, Bucks, had prepared specially for the use of soldiers on active service, a little air-tight tin containing their tablets, and were prepared, for a remittance of eighteen pence, to send one of these tins, post free, to a soldier at any part of the theatre war whose name and address was supplied them. These could be used either as an occasional luxury or carried as an emergency ration when going into action. It was claimed that the contents would nourish a wounded soldier for twenty-four hours if he was not immediately relieved.