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The former Alva Drill Hall in Park Street.
The Kellibank Shipyard anticipated orders for several large vessels.

It was not just the war in the trenches that demanded sacrifice, loyalty and obedience to the law. In the West of Scotland the great factories and shipyards turned their efforts to providing the munitions of war against a background of industrial unrest, rent-strike protests and victimisation. And it was the women, too, who stood their ground and made sacrifices. They, too, suffered and some died as a direct consequence of their war work.

The national priority given to shipbuilding, coal and steel production, the manufacture of armaments and the khaki for uniforms gave an artificial boost to local prosperity. Alloa and Hillfoot towns shared in the temporary benefits that this brought. All the local trades were fully employed turning out munitions for Government contracts. A review of 1915 in the Alloa Advertiser stated that the demand for khaki that had taxed even the ample resources of J D Paton and Sons, necessitated an almost continuous spell of overtime. More factories were opening and the Kellibank Shipyard was taken over by a new company that anticipated orders for several large vessels. There was plenty of work to be had in the county for both skilled and unskilled workers, and an editorial added that "no-one need walk the streets in idleness".

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